11/14/19 Mosier pumpkinspice

“Our method has many applications to readily combine flavoring agents, aroma-rich essential oils and fat-soluble vitamins with food, beverages, drugs and cosmetics,” said Nathan Mosier, who led the creation of the technology per the release.

Development of cosmetics, drugs and food is often challenged by the fact that water and oil that refuse to mix. Researchers at Purdue have developed patented technology to fix this issue, according to a Purdue News Service release.

“Our method has many applications to readily combine flavoring agents, aroma-rich essential oils and fat-soluble vitamins with food, beverages, drugs and cosmetics,” said Nathan Mosier, who led the creation of the technology per the release.

Moiser is also the Indiana Soybean Alliance Soybean Utilization Endowed Chair in Purdue’s Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering.

The new method involves mixing essential oil compounds in capsules with water and includes vegetable oil, active compounds and surfactants. Mosier says that this new technology uses a low amount of energy and is cost-effective, according to the release.

“Our unique combination allows things such as essential oils to be water-compatible for use in product and drug development," he said. "Usually, when you mix oils and water, you end up with them separating or creating a cloudy mess. Our method still leads to the water looking clear because the droplets are nanoscale and not affected by visible light.”

Applications for this technology range from drugs, food and cosmetics, especially ones that are pumpkin-spice flavored. The team is also working with the entomology department to explore possible insecticides.

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